Nested Challenge Sequence – Bad Dog Agility Academy

Nested Challenge Sequence

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  • Randy says:

    Here’s the Challenge Sequence. https://youtu.be/kqKI7QnBgSU This was a tough challenge for us; it underscored how often I’m late recognizing or anticipating mental/physical commitment. As a result, Option 1 presented problems where I least expected such as the post turn at jump #2. If I didn’t move in time and/or decel sufficiently (as you warned in your analysis) Scout went off course to the 180. For Option 2, I included two camera angles because I wanted to give you a good look at my threadle cue which feels klunky, maybe because I don’t practice it enough. Want feedback on that, if you have any.

  • Sharon says:

    How do you know or decide when to use the cue “around” and when to use “in”. I’m trying to get a better handle on my cues so my dog will know what I’m trying to tell him. I’m also not sure when to use the “check” cue.

    • Jennifer Crank says:

      My the dog demoing with here, “around” is his backside cue and “in” is his threadle cue. I don’t have a “check” cue for him.

      For a backside, the handler is between the dog and the jump on approach. In order for the dog to do the jump in the correct direction they must turn TOWARDS the handler. For a threadle, the dog is between the handler and the jump. To get to the correct side of the jump, the dog must turn AWAY from the handler. Does that help?

      • Sharon says:

        Thank you so much. Yes this does help a lot and I will be watching all of the links you sent. I do thought though, that I heard you say “check, check” on the video for Option 1 between jumps 4 and 5. What did you say between those two jumps?

        • Jennifer Crank says:

          You are not the first one to ask this question on this demo. I said “Jack, Jack” as that is his name. I can hear where it sounds like “check, check” when I watched it back to figure out what I did say. I guess it is a good thing I don’t have a “check” cue as that would be a bit confusing for him 😉

          • Sharon says:

            Oh, that makes sense. So how do you decide to say his name instead of calling “around”?

            I have watched the links you recommended and found them very informative. Thank you.

          • Jennifer Crank says:

            He is a rather large dog with a large stride so when he landed off #4 I felt he was already on the takeoff of #5 making it more of a serpentine vs a backside. For a dog who lands tighter off #4, I would have cued “around”. If I was running my 12” sheltie on this demo I do think I would have cued #5 as a backside. It is certainly dog dependent in this situation.

          • Sharon says:

            OK, thanks a lot for explaining that. It makes sense. My dog is small so I need to look for where he lands when we try this sequence. Right now, it’s just too hot outside. He won’t run if it’s hot.

  • Randy says:

    In option 1, hat are you saying to your dog between jumps 4 and 5? And on a totally unrelated note of curiosity: what is the square-shaped object on wheels (?) under the A-frame?

    • Jennifer Crank says:

      Great questions! Even I wasn’t sure and had to rewatch the video to figure it out 😉 On option 1, I was using his name “Jack, Jack” between 4 and 5. I was using it to aid in the convergence that needed to occur over 5.

      As for the PVC box under the aframe, that is one tool I use for running frames. I use the “box method” as my main method for most dogs who want a running aframe and I just keep the PVC box nearby for training.

  • Carol/Pogo says:

    Here are Pogo’s challenge sequences. I left our mistakes in, so that you could see where we struggle. He didn’t understand the double threadle. So I “showed” it to him. He learns very quickly by “repeating what he did before”. So once I break it down, I can add it back into the full sequence and he will do it correctly. But that isn’t really the same as “understanding” — he would likely make the same mistake again…at a trial. But, I guess that’s a start…and it also shows me what I need to work on. Also: since I edit out the dead time, you don’t see Pogo’s annoying butt scoot. Do you have a good fix for startline scooters? Negative comments to him are not having much effect. Maybe I need to give him chicken for NOT scooting? https://youtu.be/3hLPKeXGwO8

    • Jennifer Crank says:

      I totally understand what you mean about patterning vs learning. I think many people get fooled into thinking their dog knows something when they don’t simple because they’ve repeated it enough times.

      I felt many of the handling issues here were timing, not necessarily understanding. Feedback: https://youtu.be/C2XsC4kLsvQ

      As for the SLS, here are a few resources for you: https://baddogagility.com/episode-183-starting-2018-with-start-line-problems/

      https://baddogagility.com/teaching-a-focused-start-line-stay/

      https://baddogagility.com/start-lines/

      • Carol/Pogo says:

        I’m confused about threadles. Pogo can do a threadle-slice using “in in” with a trailing inside arm (jump #5). I noticed though, that if I say “in in” when he needs to threadle-wrap (as he does here on jump 6) he will try to slice. So this made me think “I need a different verbal for threadle-wrap” since he thinks “in in” means slice and I don’t want to confuse him. So I changed my arm and my verbal: threadle wrap uses off-arm and the word “thread”. You commented that threadles at jump 5 and jump 6 should be handled the same. Can you say a bit more about why? Pogo doesn’t think they are the same, so I am following his lead – is he wrong? A related issue: Pogo has no trouble with Push+wrap versus Push+slice (because my motion is different) so I figure I can use the same word for those two. Are we on the right path: two different cues for threadle slice versus threadle wrap, just one cue for push slice and push wrap? Thanks for helping me sort through this!

        • Jennifer Crank says:

          Hey Carol! I am sooo glad you asked the question and are seeking clarification on this. It is ABSOLUTELY appropriate, but not necessary, to have two threaded verbals. That was 100% my fault for assuming you only had one. So when I said “they should be cued the same”, I simply meant they should both be cued as threadles. It is very common to have two different verbals and/or different hand cues. I use the same verbal for both but differentiate with arm cues and motion. Keeping with “in, in” and “thread” sounds like a great plan. I’m sorry for the confusion.

  • Barb VE says:

    Hi Jennifer,

    Here are Enzo’s Challenge runs. https://youtu.be/XbN-jAzB4Ts

    Barb


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