Efficient Training Podcast – Bad Dog Agility Academy

Efficient Training Podcast

You cannot view this unit as you're not logged in yet.
  • barnett.deborah@gmail.com says:

    I really enjoyed how you highlighted these 7 training recommendations. I have one question – it’s something I’ve struggled with when training. It’s the difference between single criterion and contrast training. I see the value of both — but when I’ve focused on a single criterion, it usually means a more repetitive session, which is not super motivating to either Riptide or me, frankly! Contrast training also makes a lot of sense, but will working on two different, albeit complementary skills be confusing? Thanks again – I am loving VIP and working hard not to overwhelm myself, as I then behave like my dogs and shut down/avoid, lol!

    • Esteban Fernandezlopez says:

      Yes, it CAN be confusing for dogs who are used to pattern training. You can try it and see for your own dog. In your case, your dog doesn’t love repetition, and neither does my poodle, so they may respond better to contrast training, although you’ll need to be careful not to be predictable or repetitive with your contrast training work too!

      • barnett.deborah@gmail.com says:

        Thanks for the quick reply. So for contrast, would training right and left directionals qualify? or in/threadle and out/serp work? Please don’t feel pressed to reply on the holiday, though.

  • Pam&Shasta says:

    LOVED THIS!!! After combining the first tug lessons with my module 1 tune up training tonight, shasta worked for just MY CHOICE tug (rope) without food! I used the food to fill the transition time back to first obstacle. This is HUGE for Shass. She used to have ZERO toy drive.

  • sebravo says:

    Thanks, nice podcast…
    I think I want to listen this every day….
    I want to understand when is best to use forward chaining-back chaining, for my dog. what’s is best for tight turns and rear turns?

    • Sarah Fernandezlopez says:

      We use both forward chaining and back chaining all the time. Forward chaining is what people often think of for building up a sequence, they start with 1, then 1,2, then 1,2,3 etc.

      Backchaining can be really useful at isolating the difficult part of a sequence, even if it’s not the beginning. So for tight turns, an example of back chaining would be to start your dog close to the wrap jump. This takes away all their speed and momentum. Then ask for the wrap and reward. Then add one jump BEFORE the wrap giving your dog more speed.

      As a rule of thumb, I would use back-chaining for anything your dog struggles with. And then forward chain additional obstacles after the challenging part. I hope that makes sense!

  • kpdewit says:

    I love your 7 ideas for training efficiency

  • Michelle says:

    Is there a way to download the podcast to my iPhone? I like to listen to them on my daily commute. TY


  • >

    Login